Donate

Implementing the Sustainable Development Goals

At Nature Seychelles we are committed to working with government, development partners and donors in implementing relevant actions, in particular, looking at certain goals where we can build on our existing strengths. During the Ocean Conference held in New York between 5th and 9th June 2017, Nature Seychelles became a partner in the MARECO Project which will work to Increase the awareness of children for the sustainable use of Coral Reefs and their resources. Through our Marine Conservation and Reef Rescuers work, we continue to be committed to the Call for Action (Our Ocean, Our Future) as outlined vis-à-vis the Ocean Goal.

Other SDG goals in which we have existing projects include: (3) Good Health – Green Health Program; (7) Renewable Energy – Solar Power on Cousin Island; (8) Good Jobs & Economic Growth – 13th Month Salary; (9) Innovation & Infrastructure – Blue Economy Knowledge Centre; (11) Sustainable Cities & Communities – Urban Wetland Management (13) Climate Action – Reef Rescuers Project; (14) Life Below Water – Marine Reserve on Cousin; (15) Life on Land – Wildlife Habitat on Cousin (17) Partnership for the Goals – Geffroys, MTC, Min of Agriculture, Rotary,  Kreolor,

We are actively seeking new partners and sources of funding to move the SDGs from agenda to action in Seychelles. Please contact us on This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information.    

vis-à-vis 

Nature inspired technologies to drive the economy forward

The original Blue Economy concept by Gunter Pauli was to look for the best nature-inspired technologies to shift society from scarcity to abundance by tackling environmental and other problems in new ways. The Seychelles is championing the “Blue Economy” as its future sustainable development model. At the moment there is a need to elucidate, at the least, the corners of what is meant by the Blue Economy for Seychelles as it may be all things to all men and women.

At Nature Seychelles we are convinced that the Seychelles Blue Economy model must offer a new analytical framework as well as a new way of crafting our common future. We have established a Blue Economy centre which will assist in building the content of the Seychelles Blue Economy model. The centre is headed by Ms. Kerstin Henri an experienced Seychellois economist who has worked in the developmental and environmental fields in Seychelles for over 20 years.

The centre will bring together the best practices and knowledge from various programs that Nature Seychelles is working in including research, eco-tourism, coastal & marine conservation and restoration, and climate change adaptation, as well as contributions from national and international partners. The centre will seek to source funding for innovative projects that will contribute to the building blocks of the Seychelles’ Blue Economy. 

Find us on: 

                         

The Reef Rescuers Project

Our coral reef restoration project addresses Climate Change and it's impact. The marine environment is under severe threat from Climate Change, identified as the single most palpable threat to marine ecosystems. Its impact on coral reefs have been devastating. Corals in the Seychelles and the region have been destroyed by ocean warming and coral bleaching events, threatening the livelihoods of millions of coastal peoples in Eastern Africa and the Western Indian Ocean islands.

Coral bleaching interferes with reef's health and resilience capacity, harms coral’s ability to regenerate, affects reproductive performances and increases disease prevalence. Our reef restoration project has been restoring damaged coral reefs by growing different coral species in nurseries and transplanting them onto degraded sites.

The project began in 2010 with the financial support of United States Agency for International Development  (USAID). Further financial support was received under the Government of Seychelles-Global Environment Facility (GEF)-United Nations Dvelopment Project (UNDP) Protected Area Project in 2011.

Through the project we are piloting the first-ever large scale active reef restoration project in the region using ‘coral gardening’. Coral gardening involves collecting small pieces of healthy coral, raising them in underwater nurseries and then transplanting them to degraded sites that have been affected by coral bleaching. 50,000 fragments of coral have been raised in underwater nurseries and a further 15,000 transplanted in degraded areas. The long-term “success” of this mass transplantation is yet to be monitored but the project has already had a very positive knowledge-building impact: 30 scientific divers were involved and trained on reef restoration techniques. A tool kit has been developed which highlights the lessons learnt from the project and a Business Plan will be developed to ensure project sustainability. The first ever Reef Rescuers Training program was a success with eight trainees from different parts of the world successfully completing the eight week training program 

Programme News

Saving the Giant Clams

Constance Lemuria and Nature Seychelles to restore coral reefs

Senior United States Official visits Nature Seychelles’ conservation sites

Black Pearl Seychelles Ltd donates Giant Clams to Reef Rescuers

Restauration des récifs coralliens des Seychelles (French, Plongeur.com Magazine)

Nursing Indian Ocean coral reefs back to life (Deutsche Welle)

US Ambassador praises coral project

Saving Seychelles’ Corals and Livelihoods (Green Africa Directory)

Help in deep waters

US Navy personnel give back to conservation projects

Reef Rescuers: The people who plant corals

A day in the life of a reef rescuer

Building coral reefs of the future

Reef rescue: ordinary people can participate too

Reef Rescue project begins

Press Release: Launching of project to save reefs from climate change

Videos

Reef Rescuers Project Launch (SBC news segment in Creole)

French Documentary on Reef Rescuers Project (Franck Fougère-Gnagni - Les Seychelles, Une Seconde vie pour le Corail + BONUS Longitude 181 et François Sarano)

See more on Nature Seychelles You Tube Channel

Audio

Saving coral reefs in the Seychelles (Radio piece by Deutsche Welle)

Saving endemic and threatened species


Nature Seychelles Science Programme involves research, monitoring and management of threatened endemic wildlife and their habitats. As a Birdlife International Partner we concentrate on threatened endemic bird conservation, but more recently, and in line with other conservation needs of Seychelles, we have expanded our focus and are working on other taxa including mammals, reptiles, insects and marine species.  We increase the quantity and quality of our research by conducting much of our research in partnership with institutes such as Universities.

We have undertaken research on coral reefs and the effects of bleaching, reef fish assemblages, marine turtles, Sooglossid frogsSheath tailed batsSeychelles fody, Seychelles magpie-robinSeychelles warblerSeychelles Kestrel, seabirds, introduced white-flies.

Programme News

Water for birds

Partnership for Seychelles iconic bird

An amazing conservation success story in Seychelles | BirdLife

BirdLife's History in Objects: #2 "Your own private tropical island ...

Angry Birds fight extinctions!

World Environment Day - Nature Seychelles celebrates achievements and reflects on new directions

Translocation Success: Seychelles Paradise Flycatchers take to Denis

A First for Seychelles and the Region - Cousin celebrates IBA branding

Cousin Island in the New Scientist

Of Moorhens and Magpie Robins

Hawksbill Turtle Monitoring and Research

The largest hawksbill turtle (Erechmotelys imbricata) population remaining in the Western Indian Ocean occurs in Seychelles.  However, populations have declined due to widespread harvesting of nesting females during the 30 years prior to 1994, when a total legal ban on turtle harvest was implemented.  An exception to the downward trend is the population at Cousin Island Special Reserve, managed by Nature Seychelles.

Turtle monitoring has been in operation on Cousin since 1972. Turtle monitoring forms a core part of the  Cousin  work programs during the nesting season. Records of dates and locations are kept as nesting beaches are patrolled several times a day during daylight.

Tagging has been carried out since 1973.  Wardens on Cousin apply metal tags bearing a unique identification code to the trailing edge of both front flippers of each nesting turtle encountered during beach patrols. This long-running activity has allowed Cousin to identify individual females as they return to the beaches to nest season after season.

Programme News

Conservation success: Eight-fold increase of turtle nesting on Cousin Island

The one in a thousand

Woman jailed for turtle shell smuggling

Woman Convicted for turtle meat possession

Small Grants Programme supports Turtles

 

Attachments:
Download this file (HawksbillTurtleCousin2010.pdf)Hawksbill turtle monitoring in Cousin Island Special Reserve, Seychelles: an eig[Hawksbill turtle monitoring in Cousin Island Special Reserve, Seychelles: an eight-fold increase in annual nesting numbers]240 kB

Our History

Since 1998.

Seychelles Nature, Green HealthClimate Change, Biodiversity Conservation & Sustainability Organisation

@CousinIsland Manager

Facebook: http://goo.gl/Q9lXM

Roche Caiman, Mahe

Contact Us

Centre for Environment & Education

Roche Caiman,

P.O. Box 1310, Mahe, Seychelles

Tel:+ 248 4601100

Fax: + 248 4601102

Email: nature@seychelles.net